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Saint Joseph's Catholic Church

 
The Creation Story
Parables
Saints
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Installation of Parables Windows

The Creation Story

In the beginning, when God created

the Heavens & the earth,

the earth was a formless wasteland,

and darkness covered the abyss.

God said, "Let there be light," and there was light.

Then God separated the light from the darkness.

God called the light "day" and the darkness "night."

God saw how good it was.

Evening came, and morning followed; the first day.

 

Then God said, "Let there be a dome

in the middle of the waters,

to separate one body of water from the other."

And so it happened:

God made the dome and it separated

the water above the dome and the water below it.

God called the dome the "sky."

Evening came and morning followed; the second day.

 

Then God said, "Let the waters be gathered

into a single basin."

And so it happened: the water was gathered

and the dry land appeared.

God called the land "earth" and the water "sea."

Then God said, "Let the earth bring forth vegetation."

And so God brought forth trees

and plants to cover the earth.

God saw how good it was.

Evening came, and morning followed; the third day.

Then God said, "Let there be lights

in the dome of the sky,

to serve as luminaries in the dome

and shed light on the earth."

And so it happened that God created two great lights,

the greater one to govern the day,

and the lesser to govern the night.

God saw how good it was.

Evening came and morning followed; the fourth day.

 

Then God said, "Let the water teem with an

 abundance of living creatures, and on the earth,

let birds fly beneath the dome of the sky."

And so it happened that God created all living things.

And God said to the living things,

"Be fertile, multiply, and fill the earth."

Evening came and morning followed; the fifth day.

 

Then God said, "Let us make man in our image,

after our own likeness.

Let them have dominion over the birds of the air

and fish of the sea."

So God created man in his image;

in the diving image he created him;

male and female he created them.

And so God looked at everything he had made

and found it very good.

Evening came and morning followed; the sixth day.

 

Thus the heavens and the earth and all their array were completed.

Since on the seventh day God was finished with the work he had been doing,

He rested on the seventh day from all the work he had undertaken.

 
The Parables

Jesus spoke at length in parables, saying,

"A sower went out to sow.

Some seed fell on the path, where the birds came and ate it up.

Some fell on rocky ground, where there was little soil, and the sun rose and scorched it.

Some seed fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked it.

But some seed fell on rich soil, and produced fruit a hundred or sixty or thirtyfold.

Whoever has ears ought to hear."

Jesus said,

"To what shall we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable can we use for it?

It is like a mustard seed that, when sown in the ground is the smallest of all the seeds of the earth.

But once it is sown, it springs up and becomes the largest of plants and puts forth large branches, so that birds of the sky can dwell in its shade."

Jesus said to his disciples:

"I am the true vine, and my Father is the vine grower. He takes away every branch in me that does not bear fruit, and every one that does, he prunes so that it bears more fruit.

I am the vine, you are the branches. Whoever remains in me and I in him will bear much fruit, because without me you can do nothing.

If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask for whatever you want and it will be done for you.

By this is my Father glorified, that you bear much fruit and become my disciples."

 
The Saints

Blessed Mother Theresa

 

Born in 1910 in Skopje situated in the Balkan crossroads, Mother Theresa was engaged with her local church at an early age. At eighteen years old, she felt God calling her to the life of a missionary. She joined the Sisters of Loreto in Ireland, but fourteen years later, she felt a second calling. In 1948, she founded the Missionaries of Charity, dedicated to the service of the poorest of the poor. She began visiting the slums, washing sores of the poor, nursing the dying, and caring for the sick. She started each day with her rosary in hand at the celebration of the Eucharist. From 1980 into the 1990's, she opened houses in nearly all of the communist countries. Even through increasing health issues, Mother Theresa continued to inspire others, with nearly 4,000 sisters and 610 foundations following in her footsteps. In 1997, her earthly life ended, leaving an unshakable testimony of faith and charity.

St. Kateri Tekakwitha

Feast Day: July 14

Also known as the "Lily of the Mohawks," St. Kateri was born in 1656. When she was only four years old, her village was struck with small pox, costing her the lives of both her parents. She survived, although she lost much of her sight and her face was badly scarred. When she was eighteen, she became an outcast in her village for accepting the Christian faith, but she persisted, eventually leaving her village to work at the mission near Sault Saint Louis, near Montreal. She offered her perpetual virginity as a sign of her love for Christ, hoping to one day open a convent for Native American women. However, her poor health led to an early death in 1680, with her last words being "Jesus, I love you." Upon her death, legend tells us that her face was miraculously cleared and made beautiful. She is honored as the patroness of ecology.

St. John Bosco

Feast Day: January 31

St. John was born to a poor family, and spent his younger years working on the family farm and presenting one-boy shows at the circus. Often, following the shows, his audience would remain while John repeated the homily for the day. During his time in the seminary, he worked as a carpenter, tailor, shoemaker and baker, but the "street boys" were the ones that always caught his attention. He devoted his life to working with the neglected boys that lived off the street, teaching them to pray and work, while also realizing the need for play. He died at age seventy-two in 1888, and we remember him as the patron of boys, seminarians, editors, students and young people.

   
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